Chapter 6 Chapter 6

NEOPLASIA IN OLD AGE


KEY POINTS
 
 
(1) Neoplasia is common in cats and dogs and should be considered in the differential diagnosis list of any geriatric animal presenting with non-specific signs such as weight loss, polydipsia, polyuria or recurrent signs such as pyrexia.
(2) Whenever possible avoid exposure to known risk factors.
(3) Vaccination against viruses that can cause cancer (e.g. feline leukaemia virus) should be widely practised.
(4) Early detection and treatment is desirable, so the regular screening of animals through middle age and old age is recom
(5) However benign a tumour looks - always biopsy neoplasms to obtain a definitive laboratory diagnosis.
(6) Surgery and chemotherapy can be employed successfully for the treatment of neoplasia - even in the most debilitated of old anibut additional screening and supportive management may be necessary to avoid undesirable but predictable age-related complications.
(7) Nutritional support is important for the successful management of neoplasia in geriatric patients.
(8) Avoid breeding from animals with a high risk of developing neoplasia.

6.1 INTRODUCTION

6.2 EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

6.3 DIAGNOSIS

6.4 TREATMENT

REFERENCES AND FURTHER READING