Cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) may be defined as a sudden cessation of functioning effective ventilation and effective circulation (Robello & Crowe, 1989). Table 23.1 summarises the clinical features of a CPA.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) refers to the course of action taken to restore ventilation and circulation to vital tissues. Cerebro-cardiovascular resuscitation is a newer term which emphasises the importance of preserving cerebral function. The survival rate for CPR in a dog or cat following 'true' cardiopulmonary arrest is poor and ranges from S to 20% (Crowe, 1988).
CPA may occur acutely, usually due to a single devastating factor, or chronically with a multifactorial cause.

CPR is not usually performed in animals in which death is associated with end-stage disease or is expected and likely to be unsuccessful. CPR is usually performed when CPA is unexpected and the life-threatening process leading to the arrest is considered to be reversible.



   RECENT CHANGES IN CPR RECOMMENDATIONS
  THE ABC OF CPR

BACK TO SECTION MENU

BACK TO CONTENTS