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CAT VACCINES

First broadcast on www.provet.co.uk  


This information is provided by Provet for educational purposes only.

You should seek the advice of your veterinarian if your pet is ill as only he or she can correctly advise on the diagnosis and recommend the treatment that is most appropriate for your pet.

If you own a cat (or cats) you probably know that there are a number of vaccines that you should consider giving - here is a brief resume

Many vaccines have been developed over the years to give protection to us, our children and our animals against common, debilitating diseases. There are several vaccines available for cats in the UK and these should be seriously considered for your cat(s) :

Cat flu vaccines - Vaccines are available to protect cats from the most common organisms that cause respiratory diseases (cat flu and pneumonitis and conjunctivitis) including :

  • viruses - especially feline herpesvirus 1 (also called feline viral rhinotracheitis) and feline calicivirus 
  • bacteria - chlamydophila felis

Cats should be vaccinated initially from an early age and regular boosters are recommended.

Feline panleucopenia or infectious enteritis vaccine - Feline panleucopenia is an extremely serious disease which cats should be protected against from at an early age .

Feline leukaemia vaccine - Leukaemia is a serious, devastating disease which can result in immune problems, leukaemia, anaemia  and cancer (eg lymphosarcoma). Vaccination will not help cats that are already infected with the virus - so testing is advised before they are vaccinated, but it can provide immunity against infection with the FeLV virus.

Chlamydofila vaccine - These vaccines are active against the organism chlamydofila felis  which causes flu-like sneezing and conjunctivitis, and sometimes reproductive problems.. 

Rabies vaccine - Cats are not routinely vaccinated against rabies in the UK because we do not have the disease in this country, however the vaccine is given to cats being exported. Rabies is an extremely serious disease, and a potential zoonosis (it can be transmitted to humans) so it is important to protect animals visiting parts of the world where it is present in the wildlife (including mainland Europe).

All of these vaccines are administered to cats by injection Different vaccine products have slightly different contents and may have different dosing instructions. Your veterinarian will advise you about the most appropriate vaccine for your cat, when they can be started and how frequently boosters should be given.

Safety - there are few risks associated with vaccination in healthy cats Occasionally they may be quiet, lethargic and off their food for a day or two and sometimes they get an increase in body temperature. Swelling of the face and weals on the body with itchiness occur very occasionally, and a small number of cats might vomit. In the past vaccines have been linked to the occurrence of a tumour at the injection site - but this is very rare and it is not proven that there is a direct link as tumours can occur at the injection sites in cats that have never had a vaccine.. Studies are on-going to determine why it occurs and to minimise any risks. 

Cat Vaccines licensed in the UK

Below is a list of all Feline vaccines licensed for use in the UK (Correct as at 1st October 2013). Not all brands may be available depending upon marketing decisions by the various marketing license holders. Also, the content of individual vaccines may change so you are advised to check the current details for these vaccine brands at the Veterinary Medicines Directorate website (www.vmd.defra.gov.uk ). For further information about each disease click on the highlighted links.

Key

Bb Bordetella bronchiseptica

CF    Chlamydofila felis

FCV Feline calicivirus

FeLV Feline leukaemia virus

FHV Feline herpesvirus (rhinotracheitis virus)

FPV Feline parvovirus (panleucopenia virus; infectious enteritis)

R - Rabies

Vaccine Components

Brand names

Marketing License Holder

Inactivated Viral and Bacterial vaccines

 

 

FCV + FHV + FPV + C

Fevaxyn ICHPChlam

Pfizer

FCV + FeLV +FHV + FPV + C

Fevaxyn Pentofel

Zoetis

FCV + FHV + CF

Purevax RCCh

Merial

Inactivated Viral vaccines

 

 

FCV + FHV

Purevax RC

Merial

FCV + FHV + FPV

Fevaxyn iCHP

Purevax RCP

Pfizer

Merial

FCV + FHV + FPV + FeLV

Leucofeligen FeLV/RCP

Virbac

FeLV

Fevaxyn FeLV

Leucogen

Leukocell 2

Nobivac FeLV

Versifel FeLV

Pfizer

Virbac

Pfizer

Intervet

Zoetis

R

Canigen rabies

Nobivac rabies

Rabisin

Vanguard rabies

Intervet

Intervet

Merial

Pfizer

Inactivated Viral and Bacterial vaccines

 

 

CAV + CDV + CCoV + CPV + CPiV + L2

Duramune DAPPi + LC

Zoetis

CCoV + CPiV + L2

Duramune Pi  + LC

Zoetis

Inactivated Viral vaccines

 

 

CCoV + CDV + CPV

Duramune Puppy DP + C

Zoetis

CHV

Eurican Herpes 205

Merial

R

Canigen Rabies

Nobivac rabies

Rabisin

Vanguard rabies

Intervet

Intervet

Merial

Pfizer

Live and Inactivated Viral vaccines

 

 

FCV + FHV

Purevax RC

Merial

FCV + FHV + FPV

Purevax RCP

Merial

FCV + FeLV + FHV + FPV

Leucofeligen FeLV/RCP

Virbac

Live Bacterial vaccines

 

 

Bb

Nobivac Bb

Intervet

Live Viral and Inactivated Viral and Bacterial vaccines

 

 

FCV + FHV + CF

Purevax RCCh

Merial

 

 

 

Live Viral vaccines

 

 

FCV + FHV

Nobivac Ducat

Intervet

FCV + FHV + FPV

Feligen RCP

Felocell CVR

Nobivac Tricat Trio

Versifel CVR

Virbac

Eli Lilley

Intervet

Pfizer

R

Purevax rabies

Merial

 

 

 

 

Updated October 2013