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EVIDENCE-BASED NUTRITION FOR PETS


PROMEGA 3 - Omega 3 Fatty Acid Supplement 

Provet Data Sheet/Technical Briefing

V : 14.06.04

(Scientific References are numbered in brackets)

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Description

Omega-3 or n-3 fatty acids are long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The two most common Omega-3 fatty acids used as nutritional supplements in companion animals are Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) which are present in Marine Fish Oil

EPA is a precursor to the series-3 prostaglandins, series-5 leukotrienes and series-3 thromboxanes , which are antiartherogenic and antithrombogenic. EPA is believed to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions through it’s role in eicosanoid biochemistry. EPA also lowers triglyceride by inhibiting lipogenesis and stimulating fatty acid oxidation in the mitochondria. (1)

DHA is an important component of phospholipids in cell membranes, especially in the brain and retina. It is important for normal brain function being one of the main structural components of the grey matter, it may lower triglyceride levels and it is believed to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory actions. (1)


PROMEGA 3 Product Presentation

Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in Marine Fish Oil

Capsules (contain 30% omega-3 18EPA: 12DHA on Typical Analysis).

a) 500mg capsules (each containing 90mg EPA and 60mg DHA) for cats and toy dogs - One to two capsules daily

b) 1000mg capsules (each containing 180mg EPA and 120mg DHA) for dogs  - One to two capsules daily per 10K body weight


Uses for Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements

Omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids are thought (1) to have an important role in:

  • Promoting growth

  • Function of the nervous system

  • Blood clotting

  •  Prostaglandin production

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is indicated as a nutritional aid in the maintenance of normal body processes in which these fatty acids are involved in the body particularly for maintaining normal inflammatory responses and brain structure and function


Recommended Feeding Rates

Cats:

Minimum Requirement:

  It is not known whether cats have a dietary requirement for Omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids

Dogs:

Minimum requirement:  

It is not known whether dogs have a minimum daily dietary requirement for Omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids.

Feeding recommendations for PROMEGA-3    

500mg capsules (each containing 90mg EPA and 60mg DHA) for cats and toy dogs - One to two capsules daily

1000mg capsules (each containing 180mg EPA and 120mg DHA) for dogs  - One to two capsules daily per 10K body weight  

For racing and working dogs supplementation with 50mg EFAs /kg has been recommended, and the n-6:n-3 ratio should be 5-6:1. (6)

Contraindications, Warnings etc

For animal use only

Keep out of the reach of children

Use as directed by your veterinarian

Over-supplementation should be avoided

There have been no reports of serious side-effects following the administration of fish oils. However, high intakes may result in mild side effects in some individuals (5), including

  •  Soft faeces

  • Diarrhoea

  • Flatulence

  • Halitosis - fishy breath

Because fish oils may increase bleeding time, they should be used with caution in animals with clotting defects (1).


Precautions

Store in a cool dry place

Use as directed by your veterinarian

Nutritional supplement for animal use only  


Legal Category

Nutritional Supplement


Package Sizes

Bottle containing 60 x 500mg capsules

Bottle containing 90 x 1000mg capsules


Scientific References

1.       PDR for Nutritional Supplements (2001) Publishers Thomson, Montvale NJ         p 141-143

2.       Nutrient Requirements of Dogs (1985) National Research Council, Washington DC, Academic Press

3.       Nutrient Requirements of Cats (1986) National Research Council Washington DC, Academic Press p13-15

4.       Hand M et al. (2000) Small Animal Clinical Nutrition 4e Mark Morris Institute, Topeka, Kansas. 909-914.

5.       Hand M et al. (2000) Small Animal Clinical Nutrition 4e Mark Morris Institute, Topeka, Kansas. p915-918

6.    Grandjean D (1996) in BSAVA Manual of Companion Animal Nutrition and Feeding p74-75  

 

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